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Marco Nannini

David has been wisely sailing on the edge of the Finisterre wind acceleration trying to keep out of the strongest winds and avoiding an excessively brutal windward bashing to the finish line. He has 86 miles to go, all upwind unfortunately, with stronger winds forecast for tomorrow. David should however be able to finish in less than 24 hours and is expected in A Coruna tomorrow, April 21st morning, around 9-10 am local time, although we can try to forecast a more precise time as he comes closer. David must be certainly looking forward to his arrival, the weather is gorgeous, hot and sunny without a cloud in sight. A nice change from the winter weather arrivals in february/march. As usual we will be broadcasting live the arrival on our social media channels so be sure to tune in. The tracker has switched to hourly updates and the frequency will increase to 15′ and eventually 5′ minutes on his last 10 miles or so.    

Marco Nannini

Ari Känsäkoski dismasted north of the Kerguelens in late December on his Class40 Fuji, named ZEROchallenge for the event, and nursed his boat under jury rig in an epic 25 day voyage that saw him land in Durban, South Africa, mid January. Once in Durban Ari began a long and stressful investigation to evaluate all options such as fixing the mast and sailing back to Europe or selling the boat locally. Unfortunately Ari came to the conclusion that the only possible option to salvage his Class40 Fuji is to ship the boat back to Europe. The time Ari is allowed to keep a European boat in South-Africa is running out and even if he did fix the mast in time it will be too late in the season for a safe passage to Europe starting from the Southern hemisphere. Ari has no option: unless he takes the boat back to Europe he’d be losing huge sums to VAT and custom fees. He is in Durban working hard now to make a cradle suitable for shipping on an open top container at the end of the month. This dead-end turn of events and the tight budget of the project has forced

Marco Nannini

After sailing more than 26000 miles, reaching the psychological milestone of 1000 miles to go must feel great. The weather forecast has been rather contradicting for David, first looking great, then looking pretty grim, back to medium-great. The wind direction is not as unfavourable as it was initially forecast and David is back on course towards A Coruna and has even managed to get out of the light winds so that he is now pointing right for the finish. There is still some uncertainty as to weather the relatively favourable wind will move north west with David or whether he will find himself upwind. Currently the forecast does not look too bad for the next few days and the tricky part could come as he approaches the Iberian Peninsula, let’s leave speculation as to what will happen to the next few days and lets have David celebrate his incredible milestone, I am sure he can almost smell Pulpo Gallego and almond pie from the hills of Santiago.  As for the expected arrival, I think the weekend 20-21 April looks very likely, but we’ll keep you posted on this as usual.

Marco Nannini

When a few days ago David Linger started to point his bow at speed straight for A Coruna it really looked like a breakout. In trading terms a breakout when a resistance is broken through an a path is found to new highs. However when the bets are placed sometimes you find out it was just a bull trap and you are quickly pushed back below the resistance, hence why it is referred to as a false breakout. From finance to sailing we could say that David looked poised to have an easy sail to the finish only for the forecast to change very rapidly. Not only he was pushed back by the Azores high which has slowed him down for 2 days now, but the path to Iberian peninsula seems to have plenty of resistance, with winds from the west and north-west sector. Probably not what David wanted to find, but just as the forecast of a few days ago proved to be very changeable, let’s hope we see a new reversal of the winds to support him to the finish.

Marco Nannini

After the grounding in the Bay of Aguirre, Louis Robein was towed to Ushuaia by the Argentine Navy where he immediately got on with his repairs. However, he confided the bill he will receive for the tow, approximately 15,000€, was more than just a headache and was looking for a solution, including talking to the honorary consul of France in Ushuaia, to see if he could be allowed to leave and settle the bill in installments. His friends started working in the background and a fundraiser was created. GSC skippers launched an appeals through their social media channels. The camaraderie and friendship born during the event and the public had become a safety net for a skipper in need. Within minutes we were getting several donations every hour and by this morning nearly 500 people from all over the world had contributed with over 16,000€, incredible. Louis inspired so many with his tenacity and journey. A humble person, a pensioner with an extremely limited budget which in part was the reason for some of his struggles, as he could not afford to equip the boat with as many spares as wished. Unknowingly, he conquered the hearts of so many who